Large wind-solar hybrids identified as the way forward

Several studies have suggested that in most of the locations with good wind and solar potential, the two generation sources generally complement each other well on a daily as well as seasonal basis — basically the sun shines when the wind is weakest and vice versa.

The studies suggested the complementary generation profiles could not only be beneficial from a grid-balancing perspective, but could also allow better utilisation of transmission assets, effectively helping early recovery of transmission infrastructure costs.

Shared land, infrastructure and operation-and-maintenance strategies could also offer benefits in terms of capital and operational costs compared with separate wind and solar projects. The levelling of the hybrid generation profile could enable better generation scheduling and help save on regulatory penalties for forecast deviations.

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) published a draft wind-solar hybrid policy in June, inviting public comments. The draft targets 10GW wind-solar hybrid capacity by 2022.

Not to be left behind, the coastal state of Andhra Pradesh, which had identified wind-solar hybrid as a thrust area in its wind-power policy released last year, published a draft policy for wind-solar hybrids in August, targeting 3GW by 2020.

Like the MNRE policy, it also allows existing wind or solar projects to go for hybridisation. The generated power can be used by the project owner themselves (captive use), be sold to a third party or to a utility at a rate determined by the regulator.

Some of the measures suggested include waiving statutory and regulatory charges and shifting the onus of system augmentation on to utilities.

Adding storage

Going a step further, Andhra Pradesh floated an expression of interest (EOI) inviting corporates to partner with the state government in setting up a 500MW wind-solar-storage hybrid, expandable to 1GW, in the next three to five years.

The award for the EOI has not been announced yet, but it is understood that at least four Indian renewable-energy developers expressed interest.

In late 2015, the state of Rajasthan signed a memorandum of understanding with Suzlon to develop 1.5GW of wind-solar-storage hybrids, with about 500MW to be developed by the end of 2017.

The private sector is also looking into wind-solar hybrid projects. NTPC, India’s largest public-sector generator, recently floated a tender to develop 3.5MW of joint wind and solar capacity at the site of one of its thermal power projects in the state of Karnataka.

Suzlon, which has already ventured into solar engineering, procurement and construction contracts, has announced plans to work on developing wind-solar hybrids with storage and market it as an integrated offering to customers.

Other players interested in wind-solar hybrids include wind-turbine manufacturer and developer ReGen Powertech and generators such as Mytrah Energy and Adani Green Energy.

ReGen Powertech undertook the first wind-solar hybridisation by combining a 1.5MW commercial turbine with a 200kW solar PV system in 2014.

This new focus on wind-solar hybrids has also helped ease competitive pressures as many in the industry were seeing wind and solar as adversarial.

Although the wind-solar hybrid policies are yet to be passed, the intent is clear, and the initiative by these states to partner with the industry clearly shows the commitment and support for large scale wind-solar hybrids in India.

Source: Test from Wind Power Monthly

NYSERDA Ready for New York Offshore Wind Auction

Image: BOEM

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has submitted documents and bid deposit for the federal auction of an offshore wind site off New York, scheduled to open on 15 December.

The organisation has filed qualifications and bidder’s financial forms to the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) to take part in the auction for a 79,350-acre Wind Energy Area located 12 miles off the Long Island coast.

BOEM is offering a 10% non-monetary credit to qualified bidders who meet the definition of a “Government Authority.” NYSERDA has submitted the required documentation and requested this 10 percent credit.

“Offshore wind is crucial to meeting New York’s ambitious energy goals under Governor Cuomo,” said John B. Rhodes, President and CEO, NYSERDA. “If NYSERDA is successful in the bidding, we will engage all involved stakeholders and ensure that offshore wind in New York is developed responsibly and in a way that balances the needs of all constituents, including coastal communities and the fishing and maritime industries. We will also ensure that the site will be developed competitively for the greatest benefit for all New Yorkers.”

NYSERDA said its planned approach to developing offshore wind is modeled after similar approaches used in Europe, which have dramatically reduced offshore wind project costs there.

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Source: Test from Offshore Wind News

'Clean energy for all' pledge from EC

EC vice president for energy union Maros Sefcovic, and commissioner for climate action Miguel Arias Canete presented the proposals in Brussels. 

The new measures in the so-called “Winter Package” include plans to help renewables compete on a level playing field with other forms of energy generation. 

“In order to better accommodate the rising share of renewables, wholesale markets have to further develop and… provide adequate rules allowing shorter term trading to reflect the necessities of variable generation,” the EC said.

“Renewables producers will be able to earn revenues from the market, including system service markets that are required to maintain grid stability and security,” it added. 

However, the EC will also remove priority dispatch for new renewable energy capacity.

Other measures included a “streamlining of administrative procedures including for repowering, a grandfathering clause to protect existing investment from regulatory changes and, crucially, three-years of visibility for renewable energy support (indicative timeline, volumes and budgets),” trade body WindEurope explained.

“In addition, Member States will be required to remove regulatory barriers to long-term provider/purchaser contracts for renewables (so called corporate PPAs),” WindEurope said. 

Giles Dickson, CEO of WindEurope, welcomed the package of measures but challenged the EC to go further.

“There is still a lot of work to do in the Parliament and the Council to ensure renewables investors stick with Europe after 2020,” he said.

“If Europe is going to deliver on its goal to be number one in renewables, the Commission’s proposals have to be further developed.”

Source: Test from Wind Power Monthly

Dutch Economy Minister Proposes EUR 12 Billion to Back 2017 Renewable Energy Tenders

Henk Kamp, Minister of Economic Affairs (Photo: Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs)

Dutch Minister of Economic Affairs, Henk Kamp, has issued a letter to the House of Representatives, informing it about the opening of the SDE+ subsidy scheme for renewable energy in 2017. Through tendering processes to be launched in spring and autumn of 2017, Minister Kamp plans to make EUR 12 billion available through SDE+.

Despite the ongoing technological development in exploiting renewable energy resources such as solar, wind, water, biomass and geothermal energy, in most cases these are more expensive than fossil sources, Minister Kamp said, and the SDE+ scheme helps accelerate renewable energy technology deployment and compensate for the price gap.

In the 2016 SDE+ budget, EUR 4 billion was available in spring and another EUR 5 billion has been launched in the latest tender round. Many applications offered a lower price than expected, according to the Minister’s letter, which is a good sign of technology becoming cheaper.

The rising budgets in 2017 SDE+ reflect the growing market for renewable energy in the Netherlands, Kamp said.

Power generation by offshore wind is not included in the regular SDE+ opening but will be rolled out through separate tenders. In 2017, the government will launch tenders for the first two lots of the Hollandse Kust (Zuid) zone.

To reach the target of 16% renewable energy by 2023, the government has drawn up a roadmap for achieving sustainable energy goals through offshore wind  with 4,500MW installed in in 2023. The first two lots of Hollandse Kust (Zuid) have a capacity of approximately 700MW. With the first Borssele tender in mind, there is a cost reduction of 40% was achieved over a year, which will affect all five tenders.

The first Hollandse Kust (Zuid) tender is expected to run from 7 March to 30 March. The definitive dates and suggested time for opening of the second tender in 2017 will be published before 1 June.

Minister added that he will also inform the House about the results of the latest Borssele tender round, once decision are made.

The Dutch Energy Agreement has been agreed by government, employers, trade unions and environmental organizations to achieve 14% renewable energy in 2020 and 16% in 2023, and the SDE+ scheme contributes significantly to achieving this objective, Kamp said.

Offshore WIND Staff

Source: Test from Offshore Wind News

IEA Forecasts Large Growth of Wind and Solar Energy by 2040

Illustration

As a result of major transformations in the global energy system that will take place over the next decades, renewables and natural gas are the big winners in the race to meet energy demand growth until 2040, according to the latest edition of the World Energy Outlook, published by International Energy Agency (IEA).

IEA today presented the study in Stockholm, Sweden, and Berlin, Germany, at the request of the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy.

A detailed analysis of the pledges made for the Paris Agreement on climate change finds that the era of fossil fuels appears far from over and underscores the challenge of reaching more ambitious climate goals. Still, government policies, as well as cost reductions across the energy sector, enable a doubling of both renewables and of improvements in energy efficiency over the next 25 years. Natural gas continues to expand its role while the shares of coal and oil fall back, IEA says.

“We see clear winners for the next 25 years – natural gas but especially wind and solar – replacing the champion of the previous 25 years, coal,” said Fatih Birol, the IEA’s executive director. “But there is no single story about the future of global energy: in practice, government policies will determine where we go from here.”

This transformation of the global energy mix described in WEO-2016 means that risks to energy security also evolve. Traditional concerns related to oil and gas supply remain – and are reinforced by record falls in investment levels. The report shows that another year of lower upstream oil investment in 2017 would create a significant risk of a shortfall in new conventional supply within a few years.

In the longer-term, investment in oil and gas remain essential to meet demand and replace declining production, but the growth in renewables and energy efficiency lessens the call on oil and gas imports in many countries. Global oil demand continues to grow until 2040, mostly because of the lack of easy alternatives to oil in road freight, aviation and petrochemicals, according to the report.

“Renewables make very large strides in coming decades but their gains remain largely confined to electricity generation,” Birol sad. “The next frontier for the renewable story is to expand their use in the industrial, building and transportation sectors where enormous potential for growth exists.”

The Paris Agreement, which entered into force on 4 November, is a major step forward in the fight against global warming, IEA said, but meeting more ambitious climate goals will be extremely challenging and require a step change in the pace of decarbonization and efficiency. Implementing current international pledges will only slow down the projected rise in energy-related carbon emissions from an average of 650 million tonnes per year since 2000 to around 150 million tonnes per year in 2040. While this is a significant achievement, it is far from enough to avoid the worst impact of climate change as it would only limit the rise in average global temperatures to 2.7°C by 2100. The path to 2°C is tough, but it can be achieved if policies to accelerate further low carbon technologies and energy efficiency are put in place across all sectors, according to IEA.

E.ON welcomed the forecast, saying the study foresees renewable energy sources forming the backbone of the new energy environment and thus strong growth in the company’s markets.

“We see the IEA forecast as a confirmation of our strategy of focusing entirely on the new energy world,” said Leonhard Birnbaum, Member of the E.ON Management Board, who also serves as European Chair of the World Energy Council.

Birnbaum expects rapid renewable energy growth will also increase the importance of energy grids as well. In addition to this, he expects renewable energy growth will grant electricity a significantly more important role in both the heating and transport sectors. New business models would thus arise for E.ON, which in turn would need to be intelligently linked using digital technology, the company said.

“Our businesses in energy networks and renewable energy customer solutions provide us with representation in key markets and leave us well positioned to shape the new energy environment,” Birnbaum emphasised.

Source: Test from Offshore Wind News

Renewables to Become Backbone of Global Energy in 2040

Illustration

As a result of major transformations in the global energy system that will take place over the next decades, renewables and natural gas are the big winners in the race to meet energy demand growth until 2040, according to the latest edition of the World Energy Outlook, published by International Energy Agency (IEA).

IEA today presented the study in Stockholm, Sweden, and Berlin, Germany, at the request of the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy.

A detailed analysis of the pledges made for the Paris Agreement on climate change finds that the era of fossil fuels appears far from over and underscores the challenge of reaching more ambitious climate goals. Still, government policies, as well as cost reductions across the energy sector, enable a doubling of both renewables and of improvements in energy efficiency over the next 25 years. Natural gas continues to expand its role while the shares of coal and oil fall back, IEA says.

“We see clear winners for the next 25 years – natural gas but especially wind and solar – replacing the champion of the previous 25 years, coal,” said Fatih Birol, the IEA’s executive director. “But there is no single story about the future of global energy: in practice, government policies will determine where we go from here.”

This transformation of the global energy mix described in WEO-2016 means that risks to energy security also evolve. Traditional concerns related to oil and gas supply remain – and are reinforced by record falls in investment levels. The report shows that another year of lower upstream oil investment in 2017 would create a significant risk of a shortfall in new conventional supply within a few years.

In the longer-term, investment in oil and gas remain essential to meet demand and replace declining production, but the growth in renewables and energy efficiency lessens the call on oil and gas imports in many countries. Global oil demand continues to grow until 2040, mostly because of the lack of easy alternatives to oil in road freight, aviation and petrochemicals, according to the report.

“Renewables make very large strides in coming decades but their gains remain largely confined to electricity generation,” Birol sad. “The next frontier for the renewable story is to expand their use in the industrial, building and transportation sectors where enormous potential for growth exists.”

The Paris Agreement, which entered into force on 4 November, is a major step forward in the fight against global warming, IEA said, but meeting more ambitious climate goals will be extremely challenging and require a step change in the pace of decarbonization and efficiency. Implementing current international pledges will only slow down the projected rise in energy-related carbon emissions from an average of 650 million tonnes per year since 2000 to around 150 million tonnes per year in 2040. While this is a significant achievement, it is far from enough to avoid the worst impact of climate change as it would only limit the rise in average global temperatures to 2.7°C by 2100. The path to 2°C is tough, but it can be achieved if policies to accelerate further low carbon technologies and energy efficiency are put in place across all sectors, according to IEA.

E.ON welcomed the forecast, saying the study foresees renewable energy sources forming the backbone of the new energy environment and thus strong growth in the company’s markets.

“We see the IEA forecast as a confirmation of our strategy of focusing entirely on the new energy world,” said Leonhard Birnbaum, Member of the E.ON Management Board, who also serves as European Chair of the World Energy Council.

Birnbaum expects rapid renewable energy growth will also increase the importance of energy grids as well. In addition to this, he expects renewable energy growth will grant electricity a significantly more important role in both the heating and transport sectors. New business models would thus arise for E.ON, which in turn would need to be intelligently linked using digital technology, the company said.

“Our businesses in energy networks and renewable energy customer solutions provide us with representation in key markets and leave us well positioned to shape the new energy environment,” Birnbaum emphasised.

Source: Test from Offshore Wind News

BiFab Starts Working on Beatrice Foundations

Illustration (Image: BiFab/ archive)

BiFab’s Arnish facility began work on the transition pieces and piles for the Beatrice offshore wind farm in mid-October, increasing the workforce at the site by 71 people, according to SSE.

Burntisland Fabrications (BiFab), a Fife based company with facilities at Burntisland, Methil and Arnish, won two multi-million pound contracts with Beatrice Offshore Wind Ltd’s Tier 1 suppliers Siemens and Seaway Heavy Lifting to provide a total of 26 jackets.

Martin Adam, BiFab’s Operations Director said: “The award of the BOWL work scope to Bifab has meant Arnish and local economy have now benefited from an increase of 71 well paid jobs which has come at a seasonal time of high costs due to winter climate and festive expenditure. The increase in work will also go some way in lessening the impact on the local economy of jobs lost in the offshore sector.

“Going forward into 2017 BOWL work will continue at Arnish until end of March and ensure the working yard is visible and available so new work, if available, can be placed going forward.”

Alongside BiFab, Beatrice foundations have put to work Bladt Industries, Smulders, Sif, and EEW SPC.

The Beatrice wind farm will comprise 84 Siemens 7MW turbines with a total capacity of 588MW.

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Source: Test from Offshore Wind News

DeepOcean Bags Hornsea Project One Contract

[L-R] Pierre Boyde and Bart Heijermans from DeepOcean sign contract with DONG Energy's Duncan Clark and Peter Steen Ejler.

DeepOcean has won a multi-million pound contract to transport and install cables for DONG Energy’s Hornsea Project One wind farm, located 120km off the Yorkshire Coast. 

DeepOcean’s scope of work covers the installation and trenching of 93 inter-array cables with a combined length of 203 km. The Hornsea Project One contract also includes the associated route engineering, pre-lay grapnel run operations, installation of cable protection system and messenger wires.

Offshore work will be undertaken in two campaigns, commencing in Q3 2018 and Q1 2019 respectively.

DeepOcean’s Commercial Director for Cables & Trenching, Pierre Boyde, said: “After our awards on the Race Bank & Walney Extension projects we are delighted to be further developing our relationship with DONG Energy. We have invested heavily in class leading installation and trenching technology with a strong focus on both safety and productivity. This award will safeguard 150 jobs in Darlington and the surrounding area as well as enabling us to offer significant opportunities to the UK supply chain”.

The contract was signed today (30 November) in Grimsby, at a supply chain event held by DONG Energy to connect with potential new local suppliers.

The developer has signed contracts with UK companies for other major components of the wind farm including offshore cables, the offshore reactive compensation station and the onshore substation. Duncan Clark, Hornsea Project One Director, said: “Throughout this project we’ve worked hard to ensure as much value as possible is realised by UK businesses. Today’s announcement further demonstrates both the UK’s ability to supply the offshore wind industry, and DONG Energy’s continuing commitment to investing in the UK.”

Some of DONG Energy’s Tier 1 suppliers also took part to meet smaller suppliers, as they too could work with local businesses to help complete the works.

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Source: Test from Offshore Wind News

Vestas wins 180MW deal in Australia

Vestas will deliver a mixture of its V112-3.45MW and V117-3.45MW turbines to the Mt Emerald wind project in northeast Australia. 

The manufacturer will be responsible for the engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) of the project.

Installation is expected to take place in the first half of 2018 and a servicing deal would cover the site for a further 15 years.

The project has agreed a power purchase deal with local utility Ergon Energy to buy the output until 2030. 

“Once completed, the project will take Vestas’ total turbine installations in Australia to more than 2.1GW,” said Vestas head of sales and business development in Asia-Pacific, Gerard Carew.

“In the end, the decision for us came down to the low cost of energy and proven performance of the Vestas turbines,” said Ratch’s general manager of business development, Anthony Yeates.

The order is Vestas’ second in Australia this month. It also won a 30MW EPC deal from developer WindLab for a project in Victoria.

Source: Test from Wind Power Monthly

Aberdeen Harbour Inks 24-Year Deal with Vattenfall

Adam Ezzamel (left), project director for the EOWDC at Vattenfall, and Colin Parker, chief executive at Aberdeen Harbour Board.

Vattenfall has signed leases totalling 24 years with Aberdeen Harbour Board, as the company will use the location to support the construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance (O&M), and eventual decommissioning phases of its European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre (EOWDC), also known as the Aberdeen Offshore Wind Farm.

Vattenfall said it is set to establish its construction team’s base within the Regent Centre by next month and also move into a warehouse unit at Commercial Quay. The warehouse will undergo a substantial retrofit and the company anticipates moving into the new facilities within Q2 of 2017.

A team of up to 10 personnel, including skilled offshore wind technicians, will be based at the facilities during the lifetime of the project.

Turbine supplier, MHI Vestas Offshore wind, will provide a full service agreement for at least the first five years of operations, working together with Vattenfall from the O&M base at Aberdeen Harbour.

Adam Ezzamel, project director for the EOWDC at Vattenfall, said: Aberdeen Harbour is a natural fit for our operations while the EOWDC is a flagship project for the region and its Energetica corridor. As a hub of innovation, the project will reinforce the North-East’s global energy status by leading the industry drive towards generating clean and competitive wind energy power.” 

Chief executive at Aberdeen Harbour Board, Colin Parker, said: “Whilst Aberdeen Harbour has supported both onshore and offshore renewables projects many times in the past, we very much welcome this long-term commitment to the port by Vattenfall. We believe that our location and modern facilities are ideal to support this work, and this agreement typifies our continued strategy for diversification of harbour activity, to the benefit of the region.” 

The EOWDC is Scotland’s largest offshore wind test and demonstration facility. It is being developed by Vattenfall-owned Aberdeen Offshore Wind Farm Limited. Onshore construction onshore of the 92.4MW, 11-turbine offshore wind scheme started last month with first power expected to be generated in summer 2018.

Source: Test from Offshore Wind News